Barth Syndrome

Barth Syndrome

Barth syndrome (BTHS), also known as 3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type II, is a rare but serious X-linked genetic disorder. Though not always present, the cardinal characteristics of this multi-system disorder include: cardiomyopathy (dilated or hypertrophic, possibly with left ventricular noncompaction and/or endocardial fibroelastosis), neutropenia (chronic, cyclic, or intermittent), growth delay,, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. It is believed to be severely under-diagnosed and may be estimated to occur in 1 out of approximately 300,000 births. Family members of the Barth Syndrome Foundation and its affiliates live in the US, Canada, the UK, Europe, Japan, South Africa, Kuwait, and Australia.

The syndrome was named after Dr. Peter Barth (pediatric neurologist) in the Netherlands for his research and discovery in 1983. Cardiolipin is intimately connected with the electron transport chain proteins and the membrane structure of the mitochondria which is the energy producing organelle of the cell. The human tafazzin gene, NG_009634, is listed as over 10,000 base pairs in length, and the full-length mRNA, NM_000116, is 1919 nucleotides long encoding 11 exons with a predicted protein length of 292 amino acids and a molecular weight of 33.5 kDa. The tafazzin gene is located at Xq28; the long arm of the X chromosome. Mutations in tafazzin that cause Barth syndrome span many different categories: missense, nonsense, deletion, frameshift, splicing (see Human Tafazzin (''TAZ'') Gene Mutation & Variation Database). To date, Barth syndrome is found exclusively in males.

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